Beaker

(no subject)

Well. I was thinking of waiting 2 whole years before I'd update this again. But I really felt like writing a rant. So, I did. But then I realized that, not having posted anything in such a long time, I really should put up a general post, and attach the rant to that. So, I did. Here!

So, my last entry was promising 11 more on the attempt to read 100 books in a year. A recap: it was doing spectacularly well until I got promoted to full time at the bookstore halfway through the year, at which point my free time went down, my disposable money went up and my free time started to get used up elsewhere now that I could pay for things. So I wound up only reading 96 books last year. Alas! And my project for this year has similarly failed. It went in completely the opposite direction: 12 huge books that I've been meaning to read for a while now. I did do In Search of Lost Time, Vol. 1, Grapes of Wrath, Great Expectations, and Moby Dick. I would have finished Don Quixote, but it just felt like I was reading the same story every 20 pages for a 900 page book. I've halted Ulysses with the intent of picking it up again soon. I'm working my way through Crime and Punishment now. But I've also read a few new shorter and just as amazing authors. Italo Calvino and Milan Kundera are probably both in my top five favorite authors, now.

Alas, the bookstore took a turn for the sour, and just about a month ago they decided they were going to close and I was in the first round to go. I'm not sure where to go from here, but the panic of it all has been considerably eased by havva.

This may or may not lead to a general resumption of blogging. We'll see. With that said, on with the show:

Collapse )
Getafix thinking

On two-faced readings.

As part of my new year's resolution last year, I kept track of all the books I read, to gauge how fast I go through them. This year I kept that resolution, and expanded on it. I'm going to try to write at least one journal entry a month, reviewing all the books I've finished that month. So, theoretically, I'll have at least 12 posts this year. (well, 11, if the December post is a couple days late... and it very well might be, given how late this one was.) So, with no further ado hear are all of the books I finished reading in January (though, to be fair 2 or 3 of them I started in December)

Collapse )
  • Current Mood
    productive productive
  • Tags
Beaker

(no subject)

So, I was in a comment with a friend earlier tonight, when she used a (relative) neologism in a way that I really wouldn't have. So, I'm going to go ahead and use my new-fangled plus account to create a poll and see what you all have to say. (This started out as just one question. Then I realized I wanted to see the statistics behind it. Sorry. :) )

Collapse )
Getafix thinking

On beginning an old life

Well. After a year of getting out of school to clear my head, I've decided that it's time to go back. For those of you that are interested, Collapse )

And things are picking up on the job front, as the other B. Dalton in Chicagoland is having a bunch of people on vacation overlapping, so, instead of hiring a temp, I'll just be working there for a month or two, effectively doubling my work schedule.

I guess that's it for now. see you again in a couple months. ;P
Beaker

(no subject)

Heralding the triumphant return of science to Kansas?

It's from the New York Times, so you might need login or Bug Me Not.

Anyhoo, there's not much in the way of news. I'm probably going back to school in the fall. I'm currently crashing at a friends apartment in her spare room. (Crashing meaning here, in my third month there.) It doesn't have internet or tv, so I'm getting a lot of reading done in my spare time, and more importantly getting out a lot more. Speaking of which, for those that care, it looks like I will definitely be going back to Detroit from Saturday to Tuesday, with the express purpose of completing some forms, voting on Tuesday, and generally hanging out. There's a barbeque on Saturday I'd like to go to, but other than that, I'm pretty open. I'd really like to go to Greenfield Village to see the old time baseball be played, either Saturday or Sunday, so if anyone's interested in that, let me know.

One of my new years resolutions was to keep track of all of the books I read this year. Not only am I impressed by the quantity (I'm at around book 40 by now), it's forced me to be more diligent at finishing the books I start, and choosing better books to read. I've recently had a string of some of the best fiction I've read in a long time, discovering in succession Nick Hornby (High Fidelity, A Long Way Down, and How to be Good [Also About a Boy but I haven't read that].), Tom Robbins (Jitterbug Perfume and Still Life With Woodpecker) and P.G. Wodehouse (Leave It To Psmith, Something Fresh, Carry on, Jeeves and No Nudes is Good Nudes.

It's been a good summer. Maybe next time I come to the Library, I'll remember to write about my Great Western Adventure, but I don't have the time right now.
Getafix thinking

On god. And damn.

Collapse )

But I'm mostly posting now mostly for this article on blasphemy, generally how it's a good thing for democracies and specifically why the Muhammed cartoons were healthy:

The Righteousness of Blasphemy

It's simply not acceptable for a participant to enter public debate, have such a powerful effect upon it, and then claim immunity from the sort of treatment to which other participants are subject. As distasteful as it may be to those invested in religious belief, mocking Mohammed, or Moses, or Jesus, is therefore no more improper than mocking Karl Marx or Adam Smith or Rush Limbaugh or Hilary Clinton. The religious can't have it both ways.

Indeed, critical silence entails a kind of improper deference and even subjugation of political opinion. Flemming Rose, the culture editor of Jyllands-Posten , the Danish newspaper that originally published the cartoons, put it succinctly when he wrote: “if a believer demands that I, as a non-believer, observe his taboos in the public domain, he is not asking for my respect, but for my submission. And that is incompatible with a secular democracy.”

In fact—and here's something many will find particularly hard to swallow—it's important not only that people be free to criticize and mock religion. It's important that they actually do so, from time to time.